Chief reasons for the elimination of historical landmarks include, carelessness, dreary funding availability, or compelling alteration of the historical resource; in-turn damaging it's historical integrity, no documented history or evidence of historical significance, and ignorance of their historical acceptation.


Numerous historical homes of African-Americans, as well as homes of European Americans who held prominent roles in the civil rights movement are still standing, though they are in dire need of rehabilitation or documented evidence of the home's worthiness to be saved from demolition and be preserved. Many of these homes or businesses have been placed on the National Register of Historic Places, and deemed local historical landmarks; though these distinctions alone do not guarantee that an historical structure will be saved from demolition.


Saving such historical landmarks is a key component of the NAPAAHC. Securing funding, as well as hosting annual fundraisers for this purpose are most important to the core gist of the organization. The NAPAAHC pursues what at first glance may be conceived as impossible, and works assiduously to save and restore historical buildings important to the culture of African-Americans; rich in historic lore, indelible to the future of America, and important for what could become a renewed residence, or an economic hub for a variation of uses.

 

 

Historic Preservation

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